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5/. Kilda. 9 together in seclusion from the world at large. As far as I could learn, there were six family names among the eighteen families resident at St. Kilda. The names were as follows '.—McDonald, McCrinnen, McKinnon, McQueen, Gillies, and Ferguson. I found that they could all read, and were plentifully supplied with bibles in Gaelic. That they are a very religious people there can be no doubt,— though probably in some things their religion may run towards superstition, as must be the case in so small a community. I have said that outwardly they appeared to be a healthy and a comely race. In mechanical things they certainly are clever, making very many things for themselves which the economical division of labour throws into the hands of a few in large cities. Each man is his own shoemaker and tailor. They dye their own wool. Whatever furniture they use they make generally for themselves. 1 hey make their own candles. But perhaps the chief employment of the men is the catching of sea birds; the feathers of which they sell, and on the flesh of which they in a great part live. The bird which they eat is the fulmar. What might be the nature of its flesh to one uninitiated I had no means of testing during the few hours we spent upon the island. But in conversation with the English-speaking female inhabitant,—a Mrs. McDonald, who had been born in Sutherland shire, and had spent there the early years of her life,—I learned that she had not very readily fallen into the way of eating the fulmar. A little bit of a very young bird even yet went a very long way with her. Sometimes they have bread. Sometimes they make a stew with oatmeal and fulmar,—not delicious I should think to any but a St. Kildarite;— sometimes they luxuriate with corned mutton. Sometimes they have porridge. Occasionally they have been near to famine; and then they have been kept alive by presents,—by what we may call eleemosynary aid. A former visitor, giving an account of his visit, states that he found twenty carcases of cured mutton lying in a warehouse. But he goes on to say that the mutton had been brought from another island by the proprietor, and that they were his property. This transac- tion was no doubt comfortable to the island ; but I doubt whether it redounded to the profit of the owner of the mutton. c
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How the Mastiffs went to Iceland

Ár
1878
Tungumál
Enska
Blaðsíður
98