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How we Rode Back from the Geysers. 41 however, was heard to remark that should it be her fate to follow out the profes- sion of a washerwoman during the remainder of her life, she would prefer to be supplied with an ordinary washing-tub and stool. Such were the Geysers. The spot itself is wanting in beauty or prettiness, because the subterranean heat and the continued eruptions destroy the growth of grass, and give a weird, blackened, ill-omened look to the place. There is a hill on one side, and that also seems to have been blasted, and on the other a river into which the waters from the springs make their way. But the river is defiled with sulphur. The place is curious, no doubt, but not beautiful. Of the Geysers themselves our Artist has done the best in her power to give the reader an idea clearer than the writer has conveyed. Then came two days of galloping home, or rather two nights, for we rode chiefly during the night. Cannobie Lea was nothing to it. When Miss Reddie could get a-head with her lanky brute, there was nothing for it but to gallop after, regardless of danger. But on our return journey an additional impediment was in the way. J. B.—prudently remembering the absence of the too probably to be needed surgeon, instigated perhaps byZoega mindful of his ponies,—made strong, I may say violent, efforts to stop any young lady in her attempts to forge a-head upon the road. Often he succeeded. But it did occur more than once that the combined equestrian forces would be too many for him. On the return to Thing- valla, which was made in a very hurried fashion, he succeeded cruelly in barring the way of Miss Reddie. I never felt more inclined to fight for an injured damsel. But as he did so Miss Stuart went by him like a flash of lightning, and disappeared headlong down the road in front. We reached Thingvalla about three in the morning, hot with riding, cold with the waters of the rivers through which we had ridden, and very tired. We had carried some supper and eaten it on the way, and had had bowls of milk brought to us. Now we should have been altogether provisionless, had not our Providence been there with his tea-kettle. It was arranged that we should all sleep in the church. The tents and baggage were far behind us, and we were G
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How the Mastiffs went to Iceland

Ár
1878
Tungumál
Enska
Blaðsíður
98